Bruce Levenson and The Atlanta Hawks Basketball Team’s Pursuit For Excellence

Bruce Levenson is an extraordinary American business executive. He is a partner and one of the creators of the United Communications Group, a firm that offers consultancy services in business and management as well as internet software. He previously held ownership of Atlanta Spirit, a limited liability company that significantly thrived among other sports-based companies during his tenure.

Bruce was formerly part of the Atlanta Hawks Basketball and Entertainment LLC, which handles the affairs of NBA franchise, Atlanta Hawks.

Bruce Levenson currently serves on the executive panel of the Newsletter and Electronic Publishers Association. Before the founding of UCG, he was a writer for Observer Publishing and the Washington Star. He conducts various philanthropic activities of the I Have a Dream Foundation as president and is the director of Hoop Dreams Scholarship Fund. See, http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/undergrads-and-graduate-students-mastering-philanthropy-300038081.html.

He attended Washington University and received a Bachelor of Arts degree. He proceeded to the American University, where he earned a Juris Doctor.

In 2016, AHBE went into litigation against New Hampshire Insurance Company. This company was accused of dishonoring insurance terms and a breach of their contract terms. The former Hawks ownership group stated that it had an insurance policy that covered specific issues related to employment actions that mainly included workplace violation and violation of workplace termination-but were not limited to these.

The former Hawks ownership and Fenny came at a confidential agreement later in the year. A few days later, a group led by the co-founder of Ares Management L.P, Tony Ressler, received a sale approval. However, the lawsuit was not inclusive of the current Hawks ownership.

The sale was downplayed in the sense that the ABHE bankers had offered the initial value as between $900 million and $1 billion. The whole deal, however, ended up being offered at $730 million, reports Forbes.com.

The lawsuit states that the insurer, described as AIG, refused to acknowledge the claims made by Fenny as a breach of the policy. ABHE were seeking restitution for the settlement given to Fenny as well as an extra 50% as a penalty of the attorney’s fee and the unpaid loss.